Buddhist Dictionary By Nyanatiloka Mahathera – Ce

0

BUDDHIST DICTIONARY
Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines,
By Nyanatiloka Mahathera

-Ce-

cemetery: ascetic practice of living in a c.; s. dhutaṅga.

cemetery-meditations: s. sīvathikā.

cetanā: ‘volition’, will, is one of the seven mental factors (cetasika, q.v.) inseparably bound up with all consciousness, namely sensorial or mental impression (phassa), feeling (vedanā), perception (saññā), volition (cetanā), concentration (samādhi), vitality (jīvita), advertence (manasikāra). Cf. Tab. II, III.

With regard to kammical volition (i.e. wholesome or unwholesome kamma) it is said in A. VI, 13: “Volition is action (kamma), thus I say, o monks; for as soon as volition arises, one does the action, be it by body, speech or mind.” For details, s. paṭiccasamuppāda (10), kamma.

cetasika: ‘mental things, mental factors’, are those mental concomitants which are bound up with the simultaneously arising consciousness (citta = viññāṇa) and conditioned by its presence . Whereas in the Suttas all phenomena of existence are summed up under the aspect of 5 groups: corporeality, feeling, perception, mental formations, consciousness (s. khandha), the Abhidhamma as a rule treats them under the more philosophical 3 aspects: consciousness, mental factors and corporeality (citta, cetasika, rūpa). Thus, of these 3 aspects, the mental factors (cetasika) comprise feeling, perception and the 50 mental formations, altogether 52 mental concomitants. Of these, 25 are lofty qualities (either kammically wholesome or neutral), 14 kammically unwholesome, while 13 are as such kammically neutral, their kammical quality depending on whether they are associated with wholesome, unwholesome or neutral consciousness. For details s. Tab. II, III. Cf. prec. (App . )

cetaso vinibandha: ‘mental bondages’, are 5 things which hinder the mind from making right exertion, namely: lust for sensuous objects, for the body, for visible things, for eating and sleeping, and leading the monk’s life for the sake of heavenly rebirth. For details, s. A.V, 205; X, 14; D. 33; M. 16. Cf. foll.

cetokhila: ‘mental obduracies’, are 5 things which stiffen and hinder the mind from making right exertion, namely: doubt about the Master, about the Doctrine, about the (holy) Brotherhood, about the training, and anger against one’s fellow-monks. For details s. A.V, 206, X 14; D. 33; M. 16. Cf. prec.

ceto-pariya-ñāṇa: ‘penetrating knowledge of the mind (of others)’, is one of the 6 higher powers (abhiññā 3, q.v.).

ceto-vimutti: ‘deliverance of mind’. In the highest sense it signifies the fruition of Arahatship (s. ariya-puggala), and in particular, the concentration associated with it. It is often linked with the ‘deliverance through wisdom’ (paññā-vimutti, q.v.), e.g. in the ten powers of a Perfect One (s. dasa-bala). See vimokkha I.

It is also called ‘unshakable deliverance of mind’ (akuppa-cetovimutti); further ‘boundless d. of m’. (appamāna-c.); ‘d. of m. from the conditions of existence, or signless d. of m.’ (animittā-cetovimutti.); ‘d. of m. from the appendages’ (ākincañña-cetovimutti), since that state of mind is free from the 3 bonds, conditions and appendants, i.e. from greed, hatred and ignorance; and since it is void thereof, it is called the ‘void deliverance of mind’ (suññatā-cetovimutti)

In a more restricted sense, ‘boundless deliverance of mind’ is a name for the 4 boundless states, i.e. loving-kindness, compassion, altruistic joy and equanimity (s. brahma-vihāra); ‘d. of m. from the appendages’ stands for the ‘sphere of nothingness’ (ākiñcaññāyatana s. jhāna 7); ‘d. of mind from the conditions of existence’, for d. of mind due to non-attention to all conditions of existence; ‘void d. of m’ for d. of m. due to contemplating voidness of self. For further details, s. M. 43.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *